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Categories: Uncategorized March 19th, 2017 22:13

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常见鸡蛋英文名称/翻译: 水煮嫩蛋 各种煎蛋 水煮蛋 蒸水蛋

Categories: Uncategorized March 15th, 2015 16:45

Yolk – 蛋黄

Poached Egg 水煮嫩蛋

水煮蛋, 蛋黄被蛋清包在里面,剪开/咬开后会流动;

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http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/technique/how-poach-egg

Fried Eggs 煎蛋

Sunny Side Up

fried on one side (unturned), with the yolks golden and runny; 单面煎,蛋黄是黄色液态。

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http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Sunny-Side-up-Eggs

Over Easy 双面煎 – 蛋黄液体

An egg cooked “over easy” means that it gets fried on both sides, but the yolk stays runny  双面煎, 但是蛋黄还是液体。

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类似的, 还有:

Over Medium / Well — Flipped, unbroken yolk, yolk cooked to have a firm but wet-appearing center.

Over Hard — Flipped, broken, fully-cooked yolk.

Over Well — Flipped, intact, fully-cooked yolk.

Scrambled egg 炒蛋

Generally the eggs are mixed in a bowl before being put into the pan, and often stirred while cooking. 蛋清蛋黄搅在一起后的炒蛋;

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Omelette 蛋卷/蛋饼

a dish made from beaten eggs quickly cooked with butter or oil in a frying pan. It is quite common for the omelette to be folded around a filling such as cheese, chives, vegetables, meat (often ham), or some combination of the above.

Boiled 水煮蛋

Soft — Yolk runny, potentially with slight unset white around the yolk.

Medium — White completely set, yolk firm but with a dark, wet appearance.

Hard — Yolk completely set and pale yellow.

Steamed eggs 蒸水蛋

Chinese steamed eggs or water egg is a Chinese home-style dish found all over China. Eggs are beaten to a consistency similar to that used for an omelette and then steamed.

 

Different Eggs:

http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/16990/can-someone-please-give-an-explanation-of-different-egg-preparations

Fried Eggs:

Sunny Side Up — Not flipped, unbroken yolk. The top of the egg is just barely set.

Basted — Sunny Side Up, hot fat spooned over until the white surrounding the yolk is opaque.

Over Easy — Flipped, unbroken yolk, yolk runny.

Over Medium / Well — Flipped, unbroken yolk, yolk cooked to have a firm but wet-appearing center.

Over Hard — Flipped, broken, fully-cooked yolk.

Over Well — Flipped, intact, fully-cooked yolk.

Broken / Lightly Scrambled — Broken in pan and gently stirred while cooking – yolk and whites should not be mixed entirely.

Scrambled Eggs — Made in many different ways. Generally the eggs are mixed in a bowl before being put into the pan, and often stirred while cooking. Some recipes add fat to the eggs in the form of milk, cream, butter, or oil. A distinction can be made between Wet/Loose or Dry, which refers to the degree of doneness.

Omelettes:

Filled Omelette — Eggs mixed before cooking, possibly with added fat as in Scrambled Eggs. Cooked in fat in a saute pan; when set but the interior still wet, previously-cooked fillings (cheese, onions, mushrooms, peppers, tomatoes…) are added, and the eggs folded over into a half-moon shape.

Spanish Omelette / Western Omelette — Same as filled, but the egg mixture is poured over the fillings in a hot pan and cooked, thus incorporating the fillings into the egg.

Fluffy Omelette — Whites and yolks beaten separately. Yolks are gently folded into the whites without breaking the structure of the whites. Optional toppings are added. Cooked slowly in a pan, or baked (an electric frying pan with a lid works well for this preparation).

Boiled:

Cooked in shell in water for a timed period. Some people will refer to degree of doneness by cooking time, i.e., a “3-minute egg” is soft-boiled with some runny white around the yolk. Some recipes call for eggs to be added to boiling water, others to be started in cold water. In the cold-water start, the pot may be left on the heat or removed when the water reaches a boil. The eggs may be shocked in ice water when removed.

Soft — Yolk runny, potentially with slight unset white around the yolk.

Medium — White completely set, yolk firm but with a dark, wet appearance.

Hard — Yolk completely set and pale yellow.

Poached:

Egg cooked, out of shell, in water, stock, or other liquid — excluding fats or oils — at a temperature in the range of 160-180˚F (70-82˚C). There are possible degrees of doneness, however the typical poached egg has a runny but warm and thickened yolk and fully-set white.

Coddled:

An egg that has been very lightly cooked (poached eggs are sometimes considered coddled). This can either be accomplished with an egg coddler or cooking an egg in its shell with water that is slightly below boiling point.

Shirred:

An egg cooked in an oven at the low-mid 300’s˚F (~160˚C), contained in a ramekin, until the whites are just set and the yolk is runny but thickened. Often butter or another fat is placed on top before cooking.

Steamed:

Very similar to shirred eggs, but the ramekin is covered with some aluminum foil and put in a steamer for 7-15 minutes.

In a basket: Eggs fried in a hole made in a slice of bread

断 舍 离 – 再见射手

Categories: Uncategorized November 30th, 2014 23:11

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“Harvard ManageMentor Time Management” Notes 时间管理 笔记

Categories: Uncategorized; Tagged with: ; @ April 6th, 2014 22:43

Why Manage Your Time?

Time management is the discipline of organizing, allocating, and controlling time you use for activities in such a way that you achieve your desired results. Time management forces you to be explicit about what you value and helps you assign your efforts accordingly.

Identifying and prioritizing Goals

Types of goals:

Critical:  “must be accomplished in order for your department or unit to continue running successfully”

Enabling: “create a more desirable business condition in the long run or take advantage of a business opportunity”

Nice-to-have: “enhance your business—by making activities faster, easier, or more appealing—but don’t revolutionize your business”

Prioritize your goals

Distinguish between urgent and crucial tasks:
”Urgent tasks demand immediate attention. But every urgent matter does not necessarily support a critical goal.”

Breaking Goals into Tasks

Identify required tasks; Prioritize tasks; Sequence tasks; Estimate required time;

Analyzing How You Spend Your Time

Understand how you’re currently spending time;

Assign a priority to each activity: Critical/Enabling/Nice-to-have

Identify ways to improve your use of time

Common ‘Time-Wasters’

Procrastination

Unpleasant or uninteresting task / Fear of failure / Unclear starting point

Unpleasant or uninteresting task

  • Delegate the task—it may not be unpleasant to someone else.
  • Admit you’re procrastinating—and get the job done.
  • Envision how good you’ll feel once you’ve completed the task.
  • Schedule the task in a way that makes turning back impossible.

Fear of failure

  • If you lack the training or resources needed to complete an assignment, say so—and get the help you need.
  • If your fear stems from lack of self-confidence, defuse it by being proactive and planning all the things you’ll have to do to complete the job.
  • Get on with the job: Activity can help dispel fear.

Unclear starting point

  • Jump in anywhere. You’ll likely find a productive way forward.
  • Break the job into component parts, then specify tasks needed to complete each part. Sequence them—then tackle the first task.

Schedule overloading

Know your key responsibilities and goals; Delegate; Don’t assume everything has to be done; Learn to say no to your peers and boss;

Direct reports’ problems

  • Provide feedback on direct reports’ proposed solutions to a problem, but make sure employees—not you—implement the solutions.

Email and paperwork overload

heck e-mail only at assigned times during the day.

Distractions and switching costs

Scheduling Time More Effectively

  • Keep “urgent but unimportant” and low-priority tasks off the list entirely.
  • Block off more “free time” in your daily schedule to “Build flexibility into your schedule”

Dealing with Time-Wasting Bosses

Get clear directions on your boss’s preferences;

Consider how you might be wasting your supervisor’s time

  • Don’t bring problems to your boss to handle. Instead, bring proposed solutions, and seek his or her feedback.
  • Accommodate your boss’s work style. For example, if he or she prefers to receive information in writing rather than in person, honor those preferences.

 

At last, forgot it….

 

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AWS Summit – Singapore

Categories: Uncategorized; Tagged with: ; @ July 20th, 2013 22:13

1374468334

 

周四请了年假, 9点多才到.

Hands-On Labs一直有人排队, 等我11点多去拍的时候发现已经遥不可及了…最后拿了一长token卡片,  没有吃饭就闪了.

 

眼看token马上就要过去, 于是今天去https://aws.qwiklab.com 自学了一把. 输入token之后就可以setup EC2, EBS, RDS等等,  非常流畅的体验!

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